January 30, 2019

A Cage Without Bars

Written by Anne Dublin
Second Story Press
978-1-77260-069-8
160 pp.
Ages 10-14
September 2018

The Lord is with me. I have no fear of what man can do to me.      (pg. 1)

In 1492, the king and queen of Spain signed the Edict of Expulsion, giving the Jews of Spain the choice of converting to Catholicism or leaving the country. Many fled to Portugal where their refuge was short-lived. A Cage Without Bars is the story of Joseph, a twelve-year-old Jewish boy, who escapes from Spain with his parents and ten-year-old sister Gracia only to be enslaved by the Portuguese and shipped with other children to the island of São Tomé off the coast of West Africa.
They did not need ropes or chains to restrain us. We were bound by our grief and terror. (pg. 23)
Though Captain Caminha had been expecting a hundred African slaves promised by the king, he is surprised to be delivered of a large group of Jewish children, including Joseph and Gracia, as well as the group of convicts (degredados), who are to be put to work on establishing a settlement and farming cane to make sugar. As horrific as the ship's journey is for the children, with seasickness, poor food, minimal drinking water, dirty quarters, lashings, and Friar Escobar's regular lectures about Christianity, new horrors await them upon the island. When the Portuguese settlers who had received land grants choose their child slaves to work their land in exchange for food, clothing and shelter, Joseph is selected with six others by Dom Pereira, the expert on growing sugar cane. The Jewish child slaves live in huts behind their master's house and begin the hard work of clearing plants and trees. Gracia, on the other hand, who had been chosen to work for the captain's wife Dona Maria while still on the ship, remains by her mistress's side, tending to her clothing and hair and begins to adopt the Christian ways.

Many children lose their lives on the ship, mostly from bloody flux (dysentery), but now the remaining children begin to fall victim to tertian fever (malaria) and accidents including attacks by snakes and crocodiles. The slaves' numbers are augmented with a shipload of African slaves who are a tremendous help in clearing the land and preparing the soil, as well as planting and weeding. Because Joseph sees that they are all slaves, he doesn't always recognize the Jewish children and Africans as different. Even after he is enlisted to learn all he can about making sugar from books after Dom Pereira dies, Joseph begins to befriend the Africans, teaching a boy Tomás his letters–a punishable action–and partaking in their food and storytelling.
Most of us decided to do the best we could; to cling to life; to survive. There was no other choice. (pg. 96)
A tale of slavery cannot have a happy ending, though Anne Dublin does give Joseph a settling of the story that is bittersweet. But she makes sure that it is not contrived or impossible to believe. Perhaps that's to give the reader some hope that from such terrible historical circumstances some resolution could still occur. Still A Cage Without Bars is a very different story about slavery by recounting the historical events that resulted from the Spanish Edict of Expulsion in the fifteenth century. It's evident from author Anne Dublin's writing and historical notes, which include extensive footnotes, a glossary and references for further reading, that this was a difficult story to learn about and to tell. Still, she tells it well by embedding Joseph's story in the big picture of history, making it personal and real, not just bleak in tone and facts, and exposing a new story from the past that needs to be acknowledged in order to further our understanding and extend our compassion, all in the effort to replace ignorance and discrimination.

January 28, 2019

Queenie Quail Can't Keep Up

Written by Jane Whittingham
Illustrated by Emma Pedersen
Pajama Press
978-1-77278-067-3
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
Release March 2019

Queenie Quail may always be the last one to catch up to her parents and nine siblings when the flock goes out but she's the first to see danger when it's lurking in the grass. Seems being a dawdler has its advantages.
From Queenie Quail Can't Keep Up by Jane Whittingham, illus. by Emma Pedersen
Whether quail or human child, the dawdler is not an uncommon concern for parents. And for Mama and Papa Quail, keeping ten little ones together is always necessary when snakes and foxes and raccoons and cats–oh my!–are always searching for prey.
With the rhythmic sounds of heads "bob bob bob"-ing and the "tap tap tap" of little feet, the "ten round bodies went hurry hurry hurry" but Queenie can't keep up, no matter how often they stop to cheep at her.  She's distracted by the pink blossoms and the green grass and the shiny stones and the fuzzy caterpillars and more.
From Queenie Quail Can't Keep Up by Jane Whittingham, illus. by Emma Pedersen
But one morning when she stops to admire a feather, she spots
An unusual flash of orange.
A furry kind of orange.
A moving kind of orange.
Finally given reason to hurry, Queenie alerts her family and her parents squawk into action. Not surprising that Queenie's siblings learn the value in stopping to really see along their daily treks from then on.

Though quails are usually very quiet unless startled, Jane Whittingham gives them voice in Queenie Quail Can't Keep Up and your little ones will enjoy the repetitive chirps of the quails as they move and urge Queenie to hurry. Moreover, by boldly colouring certain phrases or words, including those repeated three times in succession, even non-readers will be able to pick up on key words and read along. Beyond the text, the story content has important embedded messages about sticking together for safety as well as taking the time to really see along the journey.  Queenie Quail may be a challenge for her family because she doesn't march to the same drummer as they do but that same difference also makes her an asset. Her observational skills and appreciation of what she sees around her is a testimonial to the benefit of mindfulness, taking in the moment and all it entails.

Queenie Quail Can't Keep Up is Toronto artist Emma Pedersen's first picture book and she does Queenie and her family, as well as Jane Whittingham, proud. Though Emma Pedersen ensures that the quail are truly quail-like, with their head plumes, known as topknots, of which Queenie's is bi-coloured, and elongated bodies for adults and rounded-bodied young, she has given them her own personal stamp of cuteness. In fact, with the adorable facial expressions on the chicks and parents, Emma Pedersen anthropomorphizes the quails just enough to help children see themselves and their families within. Similarly, the landscapes Emma Pedersen creates of stylized plants are both real and fantastical, enriching each page of the story.
From Queenie Quail Can't Keep Up by Jane Whittingham, illus. by Emma Pedersen
While the basis of Queenie Quail Can't Keep Up may be appear to be a scolding at an errant youngster, it delightfully turns into a lesson about the value in stopping to smell the grass and the blossoms and see the amazing in our surroundings, to the betterment and safety of all.

January 25, 2019

Juno Valentine and the Magical Shoes

Written by Eva Chen
Illustrated by Derek Desierto
Feiwel and Friends
978-1-250-29726-6
32 pp.
Ages 4-6
November 2018

Marilyn Monroe always said "Give a girl the right shoes and she can conquer the world." In Juno Valentine and the Magical Shoes, Juno is given the opportunity to step into the shoes of those conquering women and experience the worlds of those who achieved much in the arts, sciences and society.
From Juno Valentine and the Magical Shoes by Eva Chen, illus. by Derek Desierto
Preparing for school, Juno cannot find her favourite shoes. Delving into her closet to look for her seemingly boring white sneakers that are "her favorite running-hopping-skipping-muddy-puddly-jumping shoes", Juno and her pup are transported by a milky way into a ginormous closet of hundreds of shoes–"... a cornucopia of shoes! A feast of fashion!"–under glass cloches à la Saks Fifth Avenue.
From Juno Valentine and the Magical Shoes by Eva Chen, illus. by Derek Desierto
She becomes Cleopatra when she tries on the Egyptian sandals; Frida Kahlo in the colourful lace-up boots; Cinderella in the glass slippers; Serena Williams in her tennis sneakers; an astronaut in Sally Ride's boots; a ballerina in Misty Copeland's slippers; and more. There are athletes, scientists, and celebrities of TV, art and music. Juno tries them all, putting herself in their shoes and their lives. When she finally discovers her own shoes, she finds a way to put a little magic in them, courtesy of her experiences with those of some great women.
From Juno Valentine and the Magical Shoes by Eva Chen, illus. by Derek Desierto
American Eva Chen brings her fashionista background to inspire children to take a journey through the footwear worn by famous people, past and present, but for me it's Vancouver illustrator Derek Desierto who brings the sparkle to the story with his artwork. Derek Desierto, who is the designer of Derek Cardigan eyewear, brings a mixture of contemporary with retro design to his illustrations, delivering the fun with the footwear (and the clothing and settings) and colour bold enough to bowl over little Juno. The distinction of the women's shoes, summarized in an appendix titled "Juno's Guide to Groundbreaking Women (and their Shoes)," is like a visit to a shoe museum, introducing young readers to important women in history and inspiring them to be great in their own shoes.

January 23, 2019

The Unteachables

Written by Gordon Korman
Scholastic Canada
978-1-4431-7016-1
279 pp.
Ages 9-13
January 2019

I can always rely on Gordon Korman's books to make me laugh. But, with The Unteachables, for the first time, Gordon Korman has made me cry too. Maybe it's because I'm a teacher. Maybe it's because an injustice is righted. Maybe it's because a motley group of kids steps up in a big and meaningful way. Whatever the reason, The Unteachables delivers more than expected, just like the students in Mr. Kermit's SCS-8 class.

In a comedy of errors or even negligence, Kiana Roubini who has moved in with her father and stepmom and baby brother while mom is off shooting a movie ends up inappropriately and unregistered in class SCS-8, a self-contained special grade eight class at Greenwich Middle School. The only other students in the class are the angry Aldo Braff; Elaine ("Rhymes with pain") Ostrover; Barnstorm Anderson, an injured jock who had been passed year after year but did no work; quirky comic-movie-TV fan Mateo Hendrickson; Rahim Barclay who sleeps all day; and Parker Elias, farm boy for whom reading is just an endless barrage of confusing anagrams. Their teacher is Mr. Zachary Kermit who, though once a dedicated and inspiring teacher, was ruined by a cheating scandal twenty-two years earlier in which he had no part but for which the superintendent, Dr. Thaddeus, is determined to make the man pay dearly, forever it would seem. Mr. Kermit, or Ribbit as his class calls him, was the teacher of a student, Jake Terranova, who'd stolen and sold copies of the aptitude test, marring the reputation of the school at which Dr. Thaddeus was then principal. Now after years of reassignment after reassignment, Mr. Kermit is coasting until his early retirement at the end of the school year. Unfortunately, Dr. Thaddeus is not going to let that happen.

To the whole school, SCS-8 is the class of Unteachables and Mr. Kermit is happy to accept that. He gives them worksheets that he never grades and works on his crossword puzzle. As long as they don't burn the school down, he's okay with whatever they do or don't. But, enthusiastic young Miss Fountain next door is determined to foist her primary class management ideas on him and his students. Worse yet, she engages car dealership mogul Jake Terranova, the cheating scandal lynchpin, to interact with the kids, hopeful that a reconciliation may return Mr. Kermit to great teaching.

As in life, Gordon Korman's novels are filled with a plethora of characters, all with their own foibles and strengths. By alternating the voice of the chapters between Kiana, Parker and Mr. Kermit, along with Mateo, Aldo, Barnstorm, principal Mrs, Vargas, Dr. Thaddeus and Jake Terranova, Gordon Korman embeds perspective and perception, not always accurate but always telling.
The guidance counsellors say I have anger management problems. They don't know what they're talking about. I manage to get angry better than anybody else in the whole school. No problem. (pg. 39)
Though there is redemption for those who never should have needed to redeem themselves, The Unteachables makes sure to impart positive messages about learning and teaching, and that no one is unteachable.
How can the school know they're unteachable if nobody ever tries to teach them? (pg. 60)
With a dedication "For all teachers who soldier on" Gordon Korman has written a story for the students and their teachers that inspires everyone to do their best because the impact of that choice may never be identified but it will undoubtedly be realized.

January 17, 2019

Yael and the Party of the Year

Written by Tamsin Lane
Simon & Schuster Canada
978-1-5011-7613-5
160 pp.
Ages 8-12
2018

Yael Lewis is twelve and the party of the year is her upcoming bat mitzvah. That is, if it isn't railroaded by her mother, her anxiety over her Torah reading and public speaking, and a couple of boys that are turning her head. But that seems the norm for an almost-thirteen-year-old girl, right?

As much as I'd like to tell you more about the plot, I really can't. That's because there is no single plot line in Yael and the Party of the Year. Yael and the Party of the Year, and a second title, Tara Takes the Stage, released last year by Tamsin Lane, are part of a new series called Yes No Maybe So. I can tell you that Yael is preparing for her bat mitzvah, that she is expected to read a portion of the Torah and that there will be a party at which she is expected to give a speech. Those elements are cemented in the story as is the venue for her party, the Maize amusement park, and her friends, Tara, Gemma and Paloma, and three boys, Eli, Cam and Gabriel. After that, it's up to the reader to make decisions for Yael. Will she go to Eli's house to rehearse her reading or to the amusement park for a tour with her parents? Does she encourage Cam to attend synagogue with her family or not or does she feign illness not to go at all? Does she focus on her girl friends or give into her crushes? Who will get that special first dance?

I thought it might be impossible to review a book whose plot is determined by the choices of the reader. But a Yes No Maybe So book is less a choose-your-own-story than seeing that sometimes choices lead to only a few outcomes. Tamsin Lane, the pen name of a Canadian writer whose books I've previously reviewed on CanLit for LittleCanadians, recognizes how little things can become very big things for young people, especially when they are convinced that every decision could make or break their futures. Expecting that any decision could mean the difference between a complete and total disaster, as was Eli's bar mitzvah, and the party of the year is a heavy load for a young person upon whom great hopes are placed. Fortunately, young readers who undertake a reading of this interactive book will recognize soon enough that the outcomes may be different but they aren't always better or worse and that there's sure to be a few laughs along the way. From the epic tantrums of Yael's two-year-old sister Rivka to getting lost in a corn maze, Yael and the Party of the Year makes lightness out of seemingly critical choices. Fortunately Tamsin Lane makes sure that Yael gets a great party in the end, whether she gets kissed or not, or wears the T-shirt her mother chose or her own design, or whether her first dance is a slow one with a boy she likes or the chicken dance.

January 16, 2019

Red River Resistance (A Girl Called Echo Vol. 2)

Written by Katherena Vermette
Illustrated by Scott B. Henderson
Colour by Donovan Yaciuk
HighWater Press
978-1-55379-747-0
49 pp.
Ages 14+
November 2018

Echo Desjardins's story began in Pemmican Wars (HighWater Press, 2017), the first  volume of Katherena Vermette's A Girl Called Echo graphic novel series. Echo is a thirteen-year-old Métis girl placed in foster care, dealing with her new circumstances when she repeatedly time slips onto the prairies of the early 19th c. Métis as they hunt bison and are thrust into the Pemmican Wars.  Red River Resistance continues Echo's story, this time plunging the teen into the famous altercation of 1869-1870.
From Red River Resistance by Katherena Vermette, illus. by Scott B. Henderson, col. by Donovan Yaciuk
As their teacher, Mx. Francois, begins their lesson on the selling of seven million acres by the Hudson Bay Company to Canada, Echo is transported to the Red River colony in 1869 where she witnesses land surveyors, on behalf of the Crown and Dominion of Canada, confronted by Louis Riel and others for trespassing on Métis land. Though Echo returns to the present day to sign up for the Indigenous Student Leadership group and continue with her daily activities, she is transported multiple times to the Red River settlement where the Métis resistance progresses from the taking of Upper Fort Garry through the organizing of a provisional government and the attacks after the trial and execution of Thomas Scott.
From Red River Resistance by Katherena Vermette, illus. by Scott B. Henderson, col. by Donovan Yaciuk
Though the history of the Red River Resistance of 1869-1870 is well documented in the timeline provided at the conclusion of the book, along with a map and the 1870 Métis Bill of Rights, telling the basics of that conflict in a graphic novel format, emphasizing the illustrations with limited dialogue, is clever as it leaves room for discussion and enquiry.  Moreover, because Katherena Vermette embeds Echo's own life of struggles in the basics of the resistance, Red River Resistance becomes more an echo of fitting in amidst conflict than simply teaching history. With Scott B. Henderson's illustrations, coloured by Donovan Yasiuk, the story is fuller. It is realistic but goes beyond an illustrated encyclopedic entry. It reveals an inclusivity of people and story and takes the perspective away from the history textbooks and into that of the people who endured the injustices and strife thrust upon them.
From Red River Resistance by Katherena Vermette, illus. by Scott B. Henderson, col. by Donovan Yaciuk
••••••••••••••••••••••
Volume 3 in the series, Northwest Resistance, is set for a November 2019 release.

January 15, 2019

Harriet Tubman: Freedom Fighter Book launch (Toronto, ON)

Author

 of
Malaika’s Costume (Groundwood, 2016) 
and Malaika’s Winter Carnival (Groundwood, 2017)


 Nadia L. Hohn

is set to launch her new title 

just in time for Black History Month


Harriet Tubman
Freedom Fighter
Written by Nadia L. Hohn
Illustrated by Gustavo Mazali
HarperCollins
978-0-06243-284-1
32 pp.
Ages 4-8
Released December 31, 2018

on

Tuesday, January 22, 2019


 7 p.m.

at

A Different Booklist
779 Bathurst St.
Toronto, ON


Here are the details about the book from HarperCollins website:

Harriet Tubman was a brave woman who was born enslaved in Maryland in the 1800s. After risking everything to escape from her slave master and be free, Harriet went on to lead many people to freedom on a journey known today as the Underground Railroad.

This book covers some of the amazing aspects of Tubman's life: She led 13 escapes—all successful and at great personal risk—between 1850 and 1860. This book also covers some of the lesser-known amazing aspects of her life: During the Civil War, Harriet Tubman enlisted African American men to be soldiers. She served as a spy. AND she led a battle under the command of a Union Army colonel!

Beginning readers will learn about the milestones in Harriet Tubman’s life in this Level Two I Can Read biography. This biography includes a timeline and historical illustrations all about the life of this inspiring figure, as well as a rare historical photograph of her. Much mythology and conflicting lore exists about Harriet Tubman. This book was carefully vetted by noted Harriet Tubman expert Dr. Kate Larson.

Harriet Tubman: Freedom Fighter is a Level Two I Can Read, geared for kids who read on their own but still need a little help.


January 14, 2019

The Beauty of the Moment

Written by Tanaz Bhathena
Penguin Teen Canada
978-0-7352-6374-1
384 pp.
Ages 12+
February 2019
Reviewed from advance reader's edition

They say that those who look to the past are often saddened, those who look to the future only are anxious and those who stay in the present are content. While this is tremendously oversimplified, it could describe the experiences of seventeen-year-old Susan Foster who has immigrated from Saudi Arabia with her parents to Mississauga. Actually, although her father, whom she calls Appa, came with them to purchase a condo and a car, arranged for driving lessons for Susan and registration for school, and generally got Susan and Amma established, he has returned to Jeddah to his work as a doctor, hopeful of soon joining them permanently. So, except for regular Skype visits and phone calls to friends and family, Susan and Amma are left to navigate their new lives in Canada essentially alone.

While Alisha, her best friend in Jeddah, insists Susan is lucky to be in Canada, away from dating restrictions, Susan sees the complexity of her new situation. She will be living alone with her mother, a woman who focuses only on Susan's academic excellence and is bitter that they've moved essentially for Susan's education, and away from Appa who seemed more amenable to Susan's artistic proclivities.
In Jeddah, my father played the role of a buffer, the water to my mother's fire, a tree that bent to her wind instead of resisting its pressure. (pg. 75)
Though Susan has always excelled at school, she is learning that she is much better at rote and memorization than at interactive learning like labs and even her driving lessons. And not doing well is not an option, especially as Appa is directing her to medical school and Amma to engineering. She can't even tell them that what she dreams about is going to art school.

And then there are the boys. Actually there is one boy, Malcolm Vakil, who has caught Susan's eye, as she has caught his. Dealing with the death of his mother and a father who is abusive and cheated on his mother, Malcolm turned his grief and anger into behaviours his teachers and father see as problematic. But, though he's had a history of sneaking out, drinking and smoking, doing drugs and dating the beautiful but capricious Afrin Patel, Malcolm finds himself drawn away from those behaviours and towards Susan.

The Beauty of the Moment, told in alternating chapters from Susan and Malcolm's perspectives, focuses on the merging of two teens' stories, rich with back stories and future ambitions. Because their story is neither straightforward nor uncomplicated, exactly as life is, The Beauty of the Moment takes the reader backwards, sideways and in circles as the two may or may not find their way to each other and contentment in their family situations.

Tanaz Bhathena rocketed onto the YA CanLit scene in 2018 with her debut novel A Girl Like That (Farrar Straus Giroux, 2018) that captured the tragedies of a Saudi teen's relationship with a boy in a place of gender inequality and religious restrictions. By moving this story to Mississauga, while tethering it to Saudi Arabia via Alisha and Appa, Tanaz Bhathena expands her story to one of immigration and cultural contrast.  Yet The Beauty of the Moment is still a story of teens because Susan and Malcolm could be any teens, dealing with family, school, dating and considering their futures. Their stories are just more complicated because of cultural expectations.

Still it is the way Tanaz Bhathena tells their stories, imbuing them with the distinction of their situations and with the eloquence of voice and thought, that uplifts the plot. It may be titled The Beauty of the Moment, but the book makes sure to see that the lifetime beyond the moment helps create that beauty. There are former lives that we think were better but also hold uncomfortable memories. There is the future which generates dread but holds the promise of opportunity and change.
"Nothing lasts forever," I say. "Not this snowflake. Not our homes, not our families. But it doesn't mean you can't live in the beauty of the moment." (pg. 221)
It's being mindful of that moment and all the beauty it entails that brings contentment, and that's what Susan and Malcolm ultimately attain. That's a beautiful thing.

January 11, 2019

Meet Tom Longboat (Scholastic Canada Biography)

Written by Elizabeth MacLeod
Illustrated by Mike Deas
Scholastic Canada
978-1-4431-6391-0
32 pp.
Ages 6-10
January 2019

Tom Longboat will always be known as a world-famous runner, winner of the Boston Marathon in 1907 and Olympian in 1908 but his story is more of endurance and determination than just achievement.

Even from his humble beginnings, born in 1866 in Ohsweken on the Six Nations Reserve, Tom Longboat was a child who liked to have fun chasing cows and running around the reserve with his cousin. Even with the death of his father when Tom was just five years old, after which the family became very poor, Tom was often seen running. When placed in a residential school at age twelve, Tom ran away several times, finally hiding out at his uncle's home and never returning.
From Meet Tom Longboat by Elizabeth MacLeod, illus. by Mike Deas
It wasn't until his first race in 1905 that Tom realized how much he wanted to win and the need to strategize to ensure a win. In his 1906 Around the Bay Road Race in Hamilton, Ontario, he surprised all by winning in record time. His unorthodox running training, which included lacrosse and walking stints, along with his unusual stride of keeping his feet close to the ground flummoxed observers and other competitors but seemed to work for Tom Longboat, especially at the 1907 Boston Marathon. At that point he was declared the world's top marathon runner and the toast of Toronto and Canada. Though he did not place in 1908 Olympics, a disastrous event for countless runners who succumbed to the heat wave prevailing in London, Tom continued to run in a series of running matches at Madison Square Gardens, earning himself the title of World Professional Marathon Champion.
From Meet Tom Longboat by Elizabeth MacLeod, illus. by Mike Deas
When World War I hit, Tom enlisted and used his running skills to entertain and courier messages, thankful to return safely to Toronto after the war.  Though he never ran professionally again, choosing to make a home for himself and his family by working as a street cleaner and garbage collector, his legacy upon his death in 1949 was significant.  There was the creation of the Tom Longboat Award for Indigenous athletes, his induction into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame, the establishment of the Tom Longboat Run on the Six Nations Reserve and the Tom Longboat Day in Ontario, as well as a striking statue called Challenge and Triumph which features Tom running.

In this latest biography in the new Scholastic Canada Biography series, Elizabeth MacLeod doesn't just shine a light on the achievements of Tom Longboat. She shows his beginnings, his love for running, and the challenges which he experienced throughout his life. From the poverty his family faced upon his father's death, to the torment of the residential school system and the discrimination faced there and elsewhere, as well as surviving World War I, Tom Longboat persisted, achieving greatness. Mike Deas's cartoon illustrations, with speech bubbles to maintain the message of Elizabeth MacLeod's text, never makes the story silly or irreverent, as comics may do. His work is reflective of Tom Longboat's varied experiences as seen from Tom's perspective as well as those around him. The illustrations elevate the text to make Tom Longboat's reality accessible.

Elizabeth MacLeod and Mike Deas ensure that we meet the real Tom Longboat, a boy who ran, and a man who won, both races and at life, and who, beyond obstacles placed in his way, chose for himself the direction his running and life would take.
From Meet Tom Longboat by Elizabeth MacLeod, illus. by Mike Deas

January 09, 2019

Will Giraffe Laugh?

Written and illustrated by Hilary Leung
Cartwheel Books (Scholastic)
978-1-338-21561-8
38 pp.
Ages 2-5
January 2019

For a sweet concept lesson in how friends and a chuckle can make life better, it's Hilary Leung's newest board book Will Giraffe Laugh?
From Will Giraffe Laugh? by Hilary Leung
When Giraffe wakes up grumpy, his friends are there to help. Bear brings on his juggling skills, with no less than a ball, cherries, a plunger, a toothbrush and strawberry, but that doesn't seem to do the trick. Talented Crocodile performs a puppet show for Giraffe who ends up with a puppet stuck to his nose. Sheep makes an awesome balloon dog which unfortunately deflates and torpedoes into Giraffe's eye. Even Frog's versatile tongue gets out of hand and ties up Giraffe while seeking a fly. Finally Ladybug (remember her from Will Ladybug Hug?) tries for a smile with some flowers that only cause Giraffe to sneeze.
From Will Giraffe Laugh? by Hilary Leung
And then it starts to rain. Now everyone is sad, and Giraffe uses all their tricks to attempt to cheer up his friends. The tricks may not work but some humourous tumbles into a muddy swamp has everyone laughing.
From Will Giraffe Laugh? by Hilary Leung
Concept book–books that teach concepts like numbers to very young children–can be dull and lifeless but Hilary Leung's board books, all based on animal questions, are not. Of course, they use bright colours and bold shapes with simple text but the depth of the messages and the emotions evoked in the eyes and body language of Hilary Leung's characters make them neither boring nor facile. In Will Giraffe Laugh?, there is a message about emotions, particularly grumpiness or sadness. While it may be unreasonable to wipe away a friend's depression–though we tend to try to do so–it may be possible to draw someone out of a bad mood, and Will Giraffe Laugh? teaches that, with a little effort and some wonderful friends, relief is within reach. It may be a little messy and not as planned but, in the end, it's a worthwhile endeavour to help improve another's life, even if only temporarily.

January 08, 2019

Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest

Written by Sarah Hampson
Illustrated by Kass Reich
Kids Can Press
978-1-77138-361-5
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2018

Wherever and whenever there are judgements that something or someone is better, you have discrimination. It's done with people, animals, places, movies, and more. In the bird world, it's rampant, with some birds considered good birds, worthy of protection, and others dismissed as too ubiquitous for consideration. Pigeons were once revered as signs of peace and couriers of messages but are now often repudiated to be "rats with wings," in itself a judgement against rats. That is, until Dr. Coo and his pigeons take action.
From Dr. Con and the Pigeon Protest by Sarah Hampson, illus. by Kass Reich
Dr. Archibald Coo is a sophisticated urban pigeon who appreciates the best places to hang out and takes note of humans' attitude to pigeons. When he meets with his pigeon pals, Hootie Claw, Vern Birdman and Dove Blanchett, they begin to discuss the lack of respect afforded them.
     "Calm down?" hooted Hootie. "No one appreciates us! I'm the voice of the next-generation pigeon, and I'm not standing for it!"
     Oh, yes, he was in a flap.
From Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest by Sarah Hampson, illus. by Kass Reich
They've seen which birds are revered for their colour or song and Dr. Coo, the academic of the group, recalls how they were once the companions of the gods of ancient worlds and carriers of messages during battle. He comes up with a plan that they share with other pigeons in the city. They disappear. When the community finds a way to show their respect for the pigeons, helped with a few suggestions in a missive to the mayor, the pigeons show their own gratitude with a final message they drop on the humans.
From Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest by Sarah Hampson, illus. by Kass Reich
This final message makes Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest an effective allegory about acceptance of differences and give-and-take in relationships. The pigeons want to be respected and find a way to educate and share important information with humans while accepting that their droppings may be problematic and are willing to direct them to compost areas. It's a win-win situation but only if both parties are willing to accept responsibility and work together to find solutions to their perceived deficiencies.

Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest is Sarah Hampson's first book, yet she tells the story with the flair of a seasoned author.  She knows to use her words with frugality and punch, telling the bulk of the story but leaving openings for readers to see more than is written.  While Kass Reich is an illustrator whose artwork has graced her own darling Hamster books (Orca) as well as those of others, her illustration style seems to evolve with each project. In all honesty, I was swayed into believing that Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest was a book of non-fiction about people protesting pigeons–it could happen!–based solely on the cover which suggested a realism to the story. But Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest is a fictionalized story, albeit a whimsical one with an important message, told about some pigeons who recognize the need to take a situation under their own wings to effect change. In its own way, Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest is a big story about taking small steps.

January 07, 2019

Read a Book of Bedtime: A youngCanLit booklist

Getting a child to bed can be either incredibly easy or arduously difficult.  Whatever the situation at your home, try one of these books of youngCanLit to help ease the transition to sleep at bedtime while carrying your little ones off to dreamland.

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Animal Alphabed
Written by Margriet Ruurs
Illustrated by Jennifer Emery
Wordsong
32 pp.
Ages 2-5
2005
Bed Tales
Written by Brigitte Waisberg
Illustrated by Ariana Koultourides
Annick Press
20 pp.
Ages 2-4
2018

Bedtime 1 2 3
Written by Eric Walters
Illustrated by Josée Bisaillon
Orca Book Publishers
26 pp.
Ages 0-4
2017

Bedtime Ba-a-a-lk
Written by Rukhsana Khan
Illustrated by Kristi Frost
Fitzhenry & Whiteside
32 pp.
Ages 2-6
1998

A Bedtime Yarn
Written by Nicola Winstanley
Illustrated by Olivia Chin Mueller
Tundra Books
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2017

The Big Bed
Written by Bunmi Laditan
Illustrated by Tom Knight
Farrrar Straus Giroux
32 pp.
Ages 4-6
2018
Reviewed here

Blanche Hates the Night
Written and illustrated by Sibylle Delacroix
Owlkids Books
32 pp.
Ages 4-6
2016
The Boy and the Blue Moon
Written by Sara O’Leary
Illustrated by Ashley Crowley
Henry Holt and Co.
40 pp.
Ages 5-8
2018
Dream Boats
Written by Dan Bar-el
Illustrated by Kirsti Anne Wakelin
Simply Read Books
40 pp.
Ages 4-8
2013

Every Single Night
Written by Dominique Demers
Illustrated by Nicolas Debon
Groundwood Books
40 pp.
Ages 3-7
2006

Goodnight, Anne (Inspired by Anne of Green Gables)
Written by Kallie George
Illustrated by Genevieve Godbout
Tundra
40 pp.
Ages 4-6
2018

Goodnight, Canada
Written and illustrated by Andrea Beck
North Winds Press (Scholastic Canada)
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2012
Reviewed here

Good Night, Good Night
Written by Dennis Lee
Illustrated by Qin Leng
HarperCollins
24 pp.
Ages 0-5
2018


Good Night Sam
Written and illustrated by Marie-Louise Gay
Groundwood Books
24 pp.
Ages 3-6
2003
Goodnight, Sleepy Animals (A Nightlight Book)
Illustrated by Christine Battuz
CrackBoom
14 pp.
Ages 0-3
2016

Goodnight, Sweet Pig
Written by Linda Bailey
Illustrated by Josée Masse
Kids Can Press
32 pp.
Ages 2-5
2007

Goodnight, World
Written and illustrated by Andrea Lynn Beck
North Winds Press (Scholastic Canada)
32 pp.
Ages 2-6
2019
Reviewed here

Goodnight, You
Written and illustrated by Geneviève Côté
Kids Can Press
32 pp.
Ages 2-5
2014
Grandmother Ptarmigan 
Written by Qaunaq Mikkigak and Joanne Schwartz
Illustrated by Qin Leng
Inhabit Media
24 pp.
Ages 0-4
2013
Reviewed here
Hop into Bed!
Written and illustrated by Nicholas Oldland
North Winds/Scholastic Canada
32 pp.
Ages 3 7
2018
I Dare You Not to Yawn
Written by Hélène Boudreau
Illustrated by Serge Bloch
Candlewick Press
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2013

If I Were the Moon
Written by Sheree Fitch
Illustrated by Leslie Elizabeth Watts
Nimbus
32 pp.
Ages 5-8
2019

In the Sky at Nighttime
Written by Laura Deal
Illustrated by Tamara Campea
Inhabit Media
28 pp.
Ages 3-6
2019




Jeremiah and Mrs. Ming
Written by Sharon Jennings
Illustrated by Mireille Levert
Annick Press
24 pp.
Ages 5-8
1990

Midnight, Mimi
Written and illustrated by Marie-Louise Gay
Fitzhenry & Whiteside
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2001

 


Moon Wishes
Written by Guy and Patricia Storms
Illustrated by Milan Pavlović
Groundwood Books
40 pp.
Ages 4-7
2019
Reviewed here 
Mortimer
Written by Robert Munsch
Illustrated by Michael Martchenko
Annick Press
28 pp.
Ages 5-8
1985/2018

Mouse Tales
Written by Philip Roy
Illustrated by Andrea Torrey Balsara
Ronsdale Press
32 pp.
Ages 4-8
2014
Reviewed here
Nap Time
Written by Susan Hughes
Annick Press
14 pp.
Ages 1-3
2017

Nat the Cat Can Sleep Like That
Written by Victoria Allenby
Illustrated by Tara Anderson
Pajama Press
32 pp.
Ages 2-52013
Reviewed here

No Monsters Here
Written by Sharon Jennings
Illustrated by Ruth Ohi
Fitzhenry & Whiteside
24 pp.
Ages 2-7
2004

Ocean Meets Sky
Written and illustrated by Eric and Terry Fan
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
48 pp.
Ages 4-8
2018
Penelope and the Monsters
Written by Sheri Radford
Illustrated by Christine Tripp
Lobster Press
32 pp.
Ages 3-8
2005
The Pirate's Bed
Written by Nicola Winstanley
Illustrated by Matt James
Tundra Books
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2015

Rokko
Written and illustrated by Paola Opal
Simply Read Books
24 pp.
Ages 0-4
2012

Scaredy Squirrel at Night
Written and illustrated by Mélanie Watt
Kids Can Press
32 pp.
Ages 5-10
2009

Shadow Chasers
Written and illustrated by Elly MacKay
Running Press Kids
32 pp.
Ages 4-6
2014

Shh! My Brother's Napping
Written and illustrated by Ruth Ohi
North Winds Press/Scholastic Canada
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2014
Reviewed here

Sing a Song of Bedtime
Written and illustrated by Barbara Reid
Scholastic Canada
32 pp.
Ages 0-6
2015
Reviewed here
Sleepers
Written and illustrated by Dayal Kaur Khalsa
Tundra
24 pp.
Ages 2-5
1999

Sleep, Sheep!
Written by Kerry Lyn Sparrow
Illustrated by Guillaume Perreault
Kids Can Press
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2018
Reviewed here

Sleep Tight, Mrs. Ming
Written by Sharon Jennings
Illustrated by Mireille Levert
Annick Press
24 pp.
Ages 5-8
1993

The Sleeping Porch
Written and illustrated by Ian Wallace
Groundwood Books
32 pp.
Ages 4-7
2008
Sleepy Bird
Written and illustrated by Jeremy Tankard
Scholastic Press
32 pp.
Ages 3-5
2018
Reviewed here

Song for a Summer Night: A Lullaby
Written by Robert Heidbreder
Illustrated by Qin Leng
Groundwood Books
32 pp.
Ages 3-7
2015
Reviewed here

Sweetest Kulu
Written  by Celina Kalluk
Illustrated by Alexandria Neonakis
Inhabit Media
32 pp.
Ages 0-6
2014
Reviewed here
Thank You for My Bed
Written and illustrated by Doretta Groenendyk
Acorn Press
24 pp.
Ages 1-5
2011

Time for Bed: Baby’s Bedtime Routine (Baby Steps)
Written by Carol McDougall & Shanda LaRamee-Jones
Nimbus
18 pp.
Ages 0-2
2018

A Wave Came Through Our Window
Written by Zetta Elliott
Illustrated by Charity Russell
Rosetta Press
26 pp.
Ages 4-7
2015

Where's Bunny?
Written by Theo Heras
Illustrated by Renné Benoit
Pajama Press
24 pp.
Ages 1-3
2018
Reviewed here
Will Sheep Sleep?
Written and illustrated by Hilary Leung
Scholastic
40 pp.
Ages 0-3
2018
Who Is Sleeping in Aunty's Bed?
Written by Kathy Stinson
Illustrated by Robin Baird Lewis
Oxford University Press
32 pp.
Ages 5-8
1991